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Workshop on Research Gaps and Opportunities for Exploring the Relationship of the Arts to Health and Well-Being in Older Adults

The September 14, 2012 workshop focussed on research gaps and opportunities for exploring the relationship of arts participation and creativity to physical health and psychological well-being in older adults.

The workshop was presented by the National Academy of Sciences, Committee on National Statistics, at the request of a consortium of the National Endowment for the Arts and three units within the National Institutes of Health: the National Institute on Aging, the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, and the National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine.

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Panel 2 - Comparative benefits or weaknesses of arts therapies over other behavioral and/or pharmacological interventions for older adults experiencing declines in cognitive, sensory, and/or motor ability.

 


The Arts, New Growth Theory, and Economic Development

New growth theory argues that, in advanced economies, economic growth stems less from the acquisition of additional capital and more from innovation and new ideas. On May 10, 2012, the Brookings Institution and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) hosted a symposium examining new growth theory as a tool for assessing the impact of art and culture on the U.S. economy, including the theory that cities play a major role in facilitating economic growth. The symposium featured papers jointly commissioned by the NEA Office of Research & Analysis and Michael Rushton, the co-editor of the Journal of Cultural Economics. The presentations were moderated by experts from Brookings, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the U.S. Department of Commerce.

The abstracts of the commissioned papers are available in a single PDF.

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